Using Poser Cameras Inside Tight Spaces

Using Poser Cameras Inside Tight Spaces

How to use Poser cameras to render a scene...

Camera Effects

Camera Effects

Camera Angles and Effects Creating Top-Down Dramatic Camera Effects...

Aiko 3 Character #1 Design

Aiko 3 Character #1 Design

Creating Lexi Brown using Aiko 3   Day 1:...

Kirei na Kanjou for Aiko 3 Gamma Tweak

Kirei na Kanjou for Aiko 3 Gamma Tweak

       Poser Pro 2010 comes with a Gamma...

  • Using Poser Cameras Inside Tight Spaces

    Using Poser Cameras Inside Tight Spaces

  • Camera Effects

    Camera Effects

  • Aiko 3 Character #1 Design

    Aiko 3 Character #1 Design

  • Kirei na Kanjou for Aiko 3 Gamma Tweak

    Kirei na Kanjou for Aiko 3 Gamma Tweak

      Gamma Correction in Poser Pro 2010 is a really good feature but it's not the easiest feature to work with because the same settings don't work for every model.  For this little trick we'll be working with the Kirei na Kanjou character for Aiko 3 (Shown in image below), gamma correction, gamma change, lighting, indirect lighting, and Photoshop.

 

Kirei na Kanjou

Kirei na Kanjou

 

 

     Sounds like a lot but it's really simple once you understand how the gamma correction and the change gamma script in Poser Pro 2012 works.  But before we get into the Poser By Design way of using gamma, let's define Gamma in our terms.  Gamma is simply an option that will brighten or darken your image based on the settings.  Is there more to it? Of Course there is but remember we're going to keep it simple.  So what's so special about the gamma correction and gamma change?  Here's what's special, both will allow you to get a little more realism out of your 3D renders and you are just a few minutes from finding out how.

 

     We'll start by taking a look at the various types of renders and their setting.  You can click on the images to see a larger size. The image below shows the set up for the scene and as you see there are 3 lights, a figure with the Kirei na Kanjou character texture, and the radiant Jaguar hair.  This is what it looks like at the start.

 

starting image

 

     This next image was rendered in Poser Pro 2010 with no indirect lighting and no gamma correction.  The render slider is set half-way so that it's just enough to have the shadows working.

 

 

     This image has the same lighting but with a gamma correction set at 2.2.  Did you notice how the hair and skin look different?  While the skin looks fine, the hair is not as full as it used to be.  Most of the time this can be fixed by using the Change Gamma script in Poser Pro 2012 and changing the gamma to .4545 (don't ask me to explain it. I just learned it that way.) only on the Transparency.  In most cases this will fix the hair problem.

 

 

     This is what the image looks like after changing the gamma for the hair transparency and rendering it with indirect lighting.  We also made a change in the gamma of the material for the Aiko 3 figure using the same change gamma script.  Lower change gamma settings will make your image lighter.  Higher change gamma settings will give your image a tan.  If the settings are too high then it will make your render appear to have a sun burn.

 

 

     The image above is looking good so far and remember this is just a draft. But at this stage I can now begin to talk about how gamma is able to change the way your renders look.  Gamma correction can either make your renders looked washed out, or make your renders appear if they have a severe tan.  In the following images we are going to try and avoid both.  The good news is that at this point you can change the gamma correction settings (not the script) through the render settings now.  The rules are a little different for gamma correction settings the lower the gamma settings the darker the picture becomes. Here are just a few examples.

 

Gamma Correction at 1

 

 Gamma Correction at 1.5

 

Gamma Correction at 3

 

Not bad for a draft render and 3 lights with a gamma change.  Now for adding a Photoshop glamour blur effect.  The blur effect is created by copying the original image and pasting in a top layer.  Give the top layer a Gaussian Blur setting of 41 and make it transparent.  The end result in this case is the image below.

Image after Glamour Blur Effect